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inspiration to youngsters hoping to be in
PostWysłany: Sro Lis 06, 2019 02:23 Odpowiedz z cytatem
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Dołączył: 22 Paź 2019
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WENGEN, Switzerland - Werner Heel of Italy was fastest in a relatively slow first training run on Wednesday for a World Cup downhill. One year after Frenchman Johan Clarey set a World Cup speed record of 161.9 km/h here, Heel hit 148.4 kilometres per hour through the Hanneggschuss straight. Heel timed 2 minutes, 39.04 seconds on the 4.4-kilometre Lauberhorn course, the longest in the World Cup, which was softened by fresh snowfalls. Peter Fill of Italy was second, 0.30 back. Patrick Kueng of Switzerland trailed Heel by 0.45 in third. Christof Innerhofer, the Italian defending champion, placed fourth, almost 10 seconds behind his 2013 winning time. Erik Guay of Mont-Tremblant, Que., was fifth. Austrian Hannes Reichelt, who briefly held the speed record last year before Clareys run, said the course had been modified in the fastest section at the two-minute mark. "They made a little bit more turns at Hanneggschuss so there is no chance to get 160 (km/h)," said Reichelt who placed third last year. Downhill standings leader Aksel Lund Svindal of Norway was 10th. "That wasnt too convincing. I actually felt better here last year when I won the trainings," said Svindal, who has never finished on a Wengen downhill podium in eight attempts. Bode Miller of the United States, the Lauberhorn winner in 2007 and 08 and runner-up the following year, was 15th fastest. Svindal and Miller both start in a super-combined event on Friday — won by the American in 2010 — that is threatened by a forecast for snow during a training run on Thursday. The slalom portion will be run first in the morning to give course workers more time to prepare the shortened downhill course in the afternoon. The 84th Lauberhorn race meeting peaks with the classic downhill on Saturday, traditionally the most popular event on Switzerlands sports calendar. A slalom on Sunday completes the program. Yeezy Boost 350 v2 Blue Tint/Grey Three-High Resolution Red . Ted Ligety, Mikaela Shiffrin, Bode Miller and Tim Jitloff underlined the squads enormous potential on the Rettenbach glacier in Austria. Yeezy Boost 350 v2 Core Black/White . - This win was more the New Jersey Devils style. http://www.yeezys350cheap.com/fake-yeezy-350-white-wholesale.html . When a game is in the balance, however, they still have the personnel and the experience to end up with the two points. Yeezy Boost 350 v2 Beluga 2.0 Grey/Bold Orange .Y. -- Dwane Casey admitted hed been concerned about his young Raptors team who had zero experience playing in close-out games -- what awaited them with the vastly-experienced Brooklyn Nets, and how theyd react. Yeezy Boost 350 v2 Replica For Sale . LOUIS -- Julius Randle had 19 points and 15 rebounds, Aaron Harrison finished with 18 points and No.It has been 10 years since Steve Moores NHL career ended with an attack by former Vancouver Canucks forward Todd Bertuzzi. The 35-year-old Moore says he still suffers from headaches and low energy, even if he feels better overall and wants to get on with his life. But there has been no closure for the former Colorado Avalanche centre, whose $38-million dollar lawsuit against Bertuzzi and the Canucks is still in the courts after numerous delays. A trial date has been set for Sept. 8. Moore, a rookie on a powerhouse Avalanche team, still remembers that game on March 8, 2004, and the devastating effect it had on his career. "I think about it at times like this," Moore said Friday in a phone interview with The Canadian Press. "When the anniversary comes around, its hard not to reflect on the impact this has had on my life, which is dramatic. "At the same time I think a lot about how grateful I am that this wasnt worse. Every time I watch it I have the same reaction other people have, which is shock and disgust. Its just a little stronger when its yourself youre looking at and when youre aware of everything that happened in the three weeks leading up to it -- the threats and all those things." It all started on Feb. 16, 2004, when Moore flattened Canucks captain Markus Naslund with an open ice hit that put Vancouvers scoring star out with a concussion but was deemed legal by the NHL. Major retaliation was expected. Vancouvers Brad May was quoted as saying there was a "bounty" on Moores head. But when the teams next met on March 3, with NHL commissioner Gary Bettman in the house, there were no incidents. The fireworks came in their March 8 game, a 9-2 Colorado win. Moore squared off against Matt Cooke in the first period, a fight that was considered a draw. It appeared that was the end of if. But things got nasty in the third frame. Moore was challenged again. He turned away. Bertuzzi skated up behind him, tugging on his jersey, then punching him from behind and falling on top of him as other players piled in. Moore lay motionless on the ice in a pool of blood before being stretchered off and taken to hospital. The diagnosis was a concussion and three fractured vertebrae. Bertuzzi was suspended for the rest of the regular season and the playoffs, which cost him about $502,000, and he didnt play during the 2004-05 lockout season. But he was reinstated for the 2005-06 campaign and has since continued his career, most recently with Detroit. He also pleaded guilty to a criminal charge of assault causing bodily harm and was sentenced in 2006 to a years probation and 80 hours of community service. There was also Bertuzzis tearful apology on television. But nothing could fully heal Moores wounds. After five years visiting the best specialists he could find, he was told he had made a remarkable recovery but none would give him clearance to playy hockey again.dddddddddddd His career was over. "That was a very difficult time for me," he said. "It took a heck of a lot longer than I expected, but I was expecting to go back and I never thought about anything other than returning to play." He has since started the Steve Moore Foundation to help people with head and neck injuries. "Over the last few years, with the number of concussion injuries, especially with high-profile players, the public has been educated in a major way, but we still have a long way to go not just in making people aware of this, but in avoiding them and treating them," he said. While Moores foundation keeps him busy, he is also still dealing with the lawsuit, which could set a standard for determining responsibility for on-ice behaviour and injuries. Moore said the suit was not so much about the money as being compensated for the loss of his dreams. When Moore was injured, he was in his first full NHL season. He had five goals and seven assists in 57 games, but injuries had seen him move up from the fourth line to regular duty with stars like Joe Sakic and Paul Kariya. "I lost my entire career in my rookie year," he said. "I think any player put in that situation would do the same thing. "I cant recover anything else. I cant recover my career, the experience of living out my dream from the time I was two and half years old of playing in the NHL." He said the injury cost him all the good things about being an NHL player: rewarding himself and his family for the hours they put in to get him there, the chance to skate in the playoffs and maybe even win a Stanley Cup, or even the chance to be an inspiration to youngsters hoping to be in the league one day. "Everything I watched my peers go through the last 10 years," he said. "Ive watched the careers theyve had and I cant get any of that back." Bertuzzi has alleged the Canucks then-coach Marc Crawford urged his players to make Moore "pay the price," while Crawford has claimed Bertuzzi disobeyed instructions to get off the ice before Moore was attacked. Asked if he has forgiven Bertuzzi, Moore spoke instead of being frustrated at the repeated delays in the trial and the resistance put up by the opposing side in the lawsuit. "Im a very forgiving person," said Moore, who lives in Toronto with his wife and two small children. "Everyone saw what happened on March 8, 2004, but what they havent seen in whats gone on since then. "To me, its just been a continuation of what happened, just off ice and away from the cameras. Its not a situation that happened 10 years ago and its over and everythings been resolved and moved on. "Theres nobody that would like to move on more than me. Every day I try to move on, and I have moved on in other areas of my life, but this isnt over." ' ' '
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Wysłany: Sro Lis 06, 2019 02:23
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